Beppler, Johann Otto 1502

Beppler, Johann Otto 1502[1, 2]

Male 1590 - 1647  (57 years)

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  • Name Beppler, Johann Otto 
    Suffix 1502 
    Born 1590  Kinzenbach, Hessen, Germany Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Gender Male 
    Misc 1628  Nassau , Germany Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    Johannes (miller at Kintzenbach) and his brother Johannes Otto (miller at Dorlar) wrote 
    Name Johann Otto Pepler 
    Name Otto Beppler 
    _FSFTID KX5X-W3N 
    _UID E05E976222054D8E9E34577938488DFDE51F 
    Died Mar 1647  Dorlar, Hessen, Germany Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Person ID I18728  Peplers and Peplows | 1502 Descendents of Johannes Beppler of Kinzenbach
    Last Modified 22 Feb 2016 

    Father Beppler, Adam 1502,   b. 1560, Kinzenbach, Hessen, Germany Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1603  (Age 43 years) 
    Mother Catharina 
    Family ID F6442  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Children 
     1. Beppler, Ludwig 1502,   b. 1617, Kinzenbach, Hessen, Germany Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1723, Rodheim-Bieber, Hessen, Germany Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 106 years)
     2. Beppler, Johannes 1502,   b. 1620, Dorlar, Hessen, Germany Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 17 Dec 1686, Atzbach, Hessen, Germany Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 66 years)
     3. Beppler, Johann Wolf 1502,   b. 1622, Dorlar, Hessen, Germany Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1688, Dorlar, Hessen, Germany Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 66 years)
     4. Beppler, Wilhelm 1502,   b. 1633, Kinzenbach, Hessen, Germany Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 14 Jun 1701  (Age 68 years)
    Last Modified 8 Jan 2018 
    Family ID F2576  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 1590 - Kinzenbach, Hessen, Germany Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - Mar 1647 - Dorlar, Hessen, Germany Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Sources 
    1. [S26] International Genealogical Index (R).

    2. [S634] German trees fom Jane Peppler, Kinzenbach tree.

    3. [S276] Website, http://www.squidoo.com/peppler-family[6/26/2012 7:37:49 AM].
      The 1628 letter from "The Undersigned Millers" to the Count of
      Nassau
      This was sent to me by Emmi Odenwald. The translation is directly below.
      The millers' letter of 1628, translated.
      Ruth von Bernuth, Assistant professor of Early modern German Literature and Culture at UNC-Chapel Hill, is
      in my Yiddish class and was kind enough to translate this letter for me over the phone! Before we get to
      the letter, here are some of her observations;
      1. The millers probably went to their pastor and asked him to write this letter for them. It is in the
      Baroque German style - that's like early high german, but the convoluted rhetoric, the use of three
      synonyms and/or repeating each thought three times is characteristic of the Baroque style whichbecame very popular in the early 17th century.
      2. Millers were considered outsiders - not really a part of farm society. "You can't control a miller. You
      had two sacks of corn when you went to the mill, they give you back two sacks of flour, but who can
      really tell how much they took for themselves? Millers were regarded as untruthful people. So,
      because they already have such a bad community image, they would not be complaining unless they
      had a really good reason..."
      3. This letter was written in the middle of the 30-Year War, which devastated the German countryside.
      There were villages existing before that war that are completely gone, they were wiped out and
      couldn't start again. The countryside was full of soldiers: French, Swedish, the different German
      factions - it was the battleground for all kins of troops. The French people didn't suffer as much
      because all the troops went into Germany. The Swedish stayed for a century. Millers were particularly
      vulnerable because the mills were located outside the village, where they couldn't be protected, and
      the millers couldn't protect themselves - they had no right to carry a sword because they weren't
      nobles.
      4. The Count to whom they were writing probably couldn't help them.